Lexington County Farm-City

to strengthen the understanding of farm-city connections that provide food, fiber, and shelter.

Potato Facts


It takes 4.5 potatoes to fill a 10 ounce bag of potato chips.

Although it shares the same name, the sweet potato is a root vegetable and only loosely related to the potato.

Potatoes are sometimes called spuds.

Three medium potatoes equal about 1 pound.

The average American eats about 124 pounds of potatoes per year while Germans eat about twice as much.

The potato, from the perennial Solanum tuberosum, is the world’s 4th largest food crop, following rice, wheat, and maize.

Potato chips are one of the most common snack foods in the world with billions of packets being consumed every year.

There are about 24 servings in a large bag of potato chips.

The sweet potato belongs in the same family as morning glories while the white potato belongs to the same group as tomatoes, tobacco, chile pepper, eggplant and the petunia.

In October 1995, the potato became the first vegetable to be grown in space. NASA and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, created the technology with the goal of feeding astronauts on long space voyages, and eventually, feeding future space colonies.

One of the main causes of the Great Famine in Ireland between 1845 and 1852 was a potato disease known as potato blight. The shortage of potatoes led to the death of around 1 million people who were dependent on them as a food source.

The Inca Indians in Peru were the first to cultivate potatoes around 8,000 BC to 5,000 B.C.

Sir Walter Raleigh introduced potatoes to Ireland in 1589 on the 40,000 acres of land near Cork. It took nearly four decades for the potato to spread to the rest of Europe.

During the Alaskan Klondike gold rush, (1897-1898) potatoes were practically worth their weight in gold. Potatoes were valued for their vitamin C.  And gold, at that time, was more plentiful than nutritious foods!

In October 1995, the potato became the first vegetable to be grown in space. NASA and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, created the technology with the goal of feeding astronauts on long space voyages, and eventually, feeding future space colonies.

Thomas Jefferson gets the credit for introducing “french fries” to America when he served them at a White House dinner.

Potato blossoms used to be a big hit in royal fashion. Potatoes first became fashionable when Marie Antoinette paraded through the French countryside wearing potato blossoms in her hair.

The Power of the Potato - Nutrition Facts about Potatoes

One medium-size potato has just 110 calories and is absolutely fat-, sodium- and cholesterol-free, making them downright undeniable for any diet. 

Potatoes are a good source of potassium…more potassium than a banana. Potatoes rank highest for potassium content among the top 20 most frequently consumed raw vegetables and fruits. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance in and out of cells and in doing so, helps maintain normal blood pressure. Potassium is also vital for transmitting nerve impulses or signals, and in helping muscles contract. Potassium may help lower blood pressure.

Potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C (45% of the DV), which is more vitamin C than one medium tomato (40% DV) or sweet potato (30% DV). Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that acts as an antioxidant stabilizing free radicals, thus helping prevent cellular damage. It aids in collagen production; assists with iron absorption; and helps heal wounds and keep your gums healthy. Vitamin C may help support the body’s immune system.

One medium potato with the skin contributes 2 grams of fiber or 8% of the daily value per serving.

Potatoes are a good source of vitamin which improves brain cell and nervous system activity and athletic performance.

One medium potato provides 6% of the recommended daily value of iron.

Iron is a major component of hemoglobin that carries oxygen to all parts of the body. Iron also has a critical role within cells assisting in oxygen utilization, enzymatic systems, especially for neural development, and overall cell function everywhere in the body. Thus, iron deficiency affects all body functions, not only through anemia, which appears late in the process of tissue iron deficits.


Lexington County Farm-City

Sponsors 2015

Clayton Rawl Farms, Inc.

Lexington County Farm Bureau

Lexington School District I Center for Advanced Agribusiness Research, Pelion

Lexington Soil and Water Conservation District

MCEC

Price's Country Store

Roof's Basket Works, Inc.

Sandhills Young Farmer & Agribusiness Chapter

SCE&G

South State Bank

W. P. Law, Inc.

W. P. Rawl & Sons, Inc.

Wingard's Nursery & Garden Center